Yoho National Park, BC – Takakkaw Falls & Emerald Lake

Takakkawa Falls 5

Yoho, named for a Cree word expressing awe, is a park of rock walls, waterfalls and glacial lakes. It’s a park with snow-topped mountain peaks, roaring rivers and silent forests.

Yoho Mtn

Yoho River 2

Yoho’s craggy peaks and steep rock faces posed an enormous challenge for Canada’s early explorers. The mountains that were the curse of railway builders are responsible for the park’s many waterfalls including Laughing Falls, Twin Falls, Wapta Falls and one of Canada’s highest at 254 m (833 ft.), Takakkaw Falls. Silt carried by streams from melting glaciers high on the mountains is responsible for the deep, rich turquoise colour of Emerald Lake and Lake O’Hara.

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Many of British Columbia’s plants and animals reach their eastern extension in Yoho. The high peaks of the Continental Divide wring out the precipitation remaining in clouds moving eastward from the Pacific Ocean. This creates pockets of wet belt forest where coastal species such as devil’s club, western red cedar and western hemlock thrive.

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Takakkaw Falls can be seen from kilometres away, but its loud roar is the first thing you notice as you approach. It is 384 metres from its base, making it the second highest officially measured waterfall in Western Canada after Della Falls on Vancouver Island. However, its true “free fall” is only 254 metres.

“Takakkaw” translates from Cree as “it is magnificent.”

The falls are fed by the Daly Glacier, which is part of the Waputik Icefield. The meltwater keeps the volume of the falls up during the warm summer months, particularly in late spring after the heavy snow melts, when the falls are at peak condition.

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Takakkaw Falls 2
Yoho River
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Here in the shadow of the Great Divide are the secrets of ancient ocean life, the power of ice and water, and the stories of plants and animals that continue to evolve today.
Emerald Lake 1

Emerald Lake is the largest of Yoho’s 61 lakes and ponds. The lake is enclosed by mountains of the President Range, as well as Mount Burgess and Wapta Mountain. This basin traps storms, causing frequent rain in summer and heavy snowfalls in winter. 

Emerald Lake 2

Emerald Lake CanoeingSilt carried by streams from melting glaciers is responsible for the deep and rich turquoise colour of Emerald Lake.
Emerald Lake Tourist

Due to its high altitude, the lake is frozen from November until June. The vivid turquoise color of the water, caused by the powdered limestone silt, is most spectacular in July as the snow melts from the surrounding mountains.

Emerald Lake Tourist 2

Emerald Lake 3

There was no better way than to end the day at the exquisite Tschurtschenthaler Lodge! What a great B&B to relax and unwind at. (Located near Golden, BC). We lucked out and got a mountainside view room for our brief stay.

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Bear Carving

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View from B&B 1 View from B&B 2

Great view from our room!

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Road Trip Photographs

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Banff, Alberta – Morraine Lake

One of the purest and most beautiful lakes in the world is located in Banff National Park in Alberta, Canada. Moraine Lake, which features turquoise water and a mountainous surrounding, is hidden in the Canadian Rocky Mountains.

Humming Bird 1 Humming Bird 2 Morraine Glacier 1 Morraine Glacier 2 Morraine Glacier 3 Morraine Lake 1 Morraine Lake 2 Morraine Lake 3 Morraine Lake 4 Morraine Lake 5 Morraine Lake 6 Morraine River 1 Morraine River 2 Morraine River 3 Morraine Rocks Mountain Face Mushroom

There are several trails around the lake that range from casual walks to more strenuous hikes. Due to bear activity some of the trails have seasonal restrictions to maximize safety. Hikers must travel in a tight group of four or more. Occasionally trails may be closed off completely. It is always best to check ahead with Parks Canada for the current trail conditions.

Rock Tree Rocky Crick

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Without exaggeration, Morraine Lake is o­ne of the most tranquil places o­n Earth.
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Roadtripphotographs

On The Undeniable Beauty of Sunset Photography

Sunset I

As photography blogger and instructor David Peterson has expressed: “It seems like every photography forum you join has this inherent bias against sunset photos”. It’s always the same charge too. Sunsets are overdone. They’re “cliché.”

So what is that supposed to mean? Now we can’t enjoy photographing this particular subject because a few people are tired of it? It doesn’t make any sense to me. After all, there’s a reason so many people take pictures of sunsets and sunrises. They’re one of the most colorful and beautiful things you can photograph. Can you honestly tell me what else has such elegant orange and purple hues? What else is as subtle and warm as the sun fading into the distance? Nothing. Literally nothing on this Earth compares, and yet there are those of us who want to condemn people for finding something beautiful and having fun capturing it and presenting it to others.

Sunset at Beach

Sunset G

Sunsets are everywhere. Nightly they appear, vast and humbling, orange, pink and purple. Like snowflakes, it is said that every single one is different. Natural, ephemeral and beautiful, they constitute exactly the kind of subject that causes people to reach for a camera: the fleeting spectacle that photography seems made to capture; the momentary vision that deserves immortalizing.

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Susan Sontag, in her famous book, On Photography, complained: ‘Photographs create the beautiful and – over generations of picture-taking – use it up. Certain glories of nature… have been all but abandoned to the indefatigable attentions of amateur camera buffs. The image-surfeited are likely to find sunsets corny; they now look, alas, too much like photographs.’

Sontag here, in part, blames photographic mass-production for the loss of wonder, but she also positions sunset photographs as the products of the aesthetically naive.

Waning Sun copy

Infernal Sky copy

Sunset photographs are widely considered to symbolize the most predictable, culturally devalued and banal of image-making practices. Critics dismiss them as ‘chocolate box’ or ‘picture postcard’; they are seen as clichés. The beauty of a sunset can be transformed, in a photograph, into something cloying. Their very ubiquity is what seems to repel; photography has tainted what it sought to cherish through overuse. It miniaturizes natural grandeur and renders it kitsch. 

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Sunset photographs have somehow come to represent a low cultural status: they are characterized as sentimental visual confectionary indicative of limited aesthetic vision and an undeveloped practice.

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“The less cultured you are, the more you require from nature before you can be roused for reciprocity. Uncultured people require blazing sunsets, awe-inspiring mountains, astonishing waterfalls, masses of gorgeous flowers, portentious signs in the heavens, exceptional weather on earth, before their sensibility is stirred to a response. Cultured people are thrilled through and through by the shadow of a few waving grass-blades upon a little flat stone.”

-John Cooper Powys – Meaning of Culture 1930

Pacific Coast Sunset

As sociologist Pierre Bourdieu has so persuasively argued, categories of taste are grounded in ingrained and stratified social and cultural experience and may be utilized to reinforce distinctions between different social groups. For Bourdieu, this is nowhere more clearly visible than in practices such as photography, which, because they are “accessible to everyone” and also “not fully consecrated” like other more legitimated cultural forms, lack a fixed and explicit coding system for judgement. This consequent flexibility of interpretation, he believes, means that the subjective meanings that different groups attribute to photography betrays their social dispositions.

In Bourdieu’s research in the 1960s, in which he examined taste as means of social distinction, he initiated discussions about aesthetic value with a range of people from different educational and occupational backgrounds, in relation to particular cultural objects including, tellingly, a photograph of a sunset. For, despite sunset photographs’ apparent mass-produced sameness, not all photographs of sunsets are equally received; they divide opinion.

Bourdieu found that the higher the level of education, the greater is the proportion who, when asked whether a series of objects would make beautiful photographs, refuse the ordinary objects of popular admiration, i.e., a first communion, a sunset or a landscape,  as ‘vulgar’ or ‘ugly’, or reject them as ‘trivial’.

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Yet, his conclusion is not simply that sunsets appeal most to the uneducated. Bourdieu extends the stratification and explains that the proportion who declare that a sunset can make a beautiful photo is greatest at the lowest educational level, declines at intermediate levels, and grows strongly again among those who have completed several years of higher education and who tend to consider that anything is suitable for beautiful photography.

Neatly encapsulating photographic hierarchies, then, sunsets are the kind of subject that can be variously adored, despised or tolerated depending on aesthetic outlook and social background.

Sunset F

in photography’s earliest decades, photographs were expected to be idealized images. This is still the aim of most amateur photographers, for whom a beautiful photograph is a photograph of something beautiful, like a woman, a sunset. In commodified camera culture, everyone takes photos of similar things; in sunset photographs, then, it seems, every single one is the same.

Sunset K

Sunset photographs may all look the same, but the meaning changes with each one. As Richard Dyer has argued about stereotypes: they “are a very simple, striking, easily-grasped form of representation but are none the less capable of condensing a great deal of complex information and a host of connotations”. Even stereotypes and clichés carry complexities and nuances. Just like sunsets, then, every sunset photograph is different.

Sunset H Sunset L

I say photograph what you want, and never allow the critical opinions of others to interfere with the way of enjoying your passion. Life is too short to listen to art critics who can’t appreciate simple beauty. There is no such thing as too many sunset photographs.

Sunset J

Much of the credit for the expressions of thought with respect to the idea of “sunsets as cliché”, is attributable to Dr. Annebella Pollen, Lecturer in Art History and Design (University of Brighton), from her essay:

When Is a Cliché Not a Cliché? Reconsidering Mass-Produced Sunsets